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From whence it is easy to judge what was the design and intention of this parable.(From the Talmud and Hebraica, Volume 3) and expanded it to include coincidence to lack of belief in the resurrection of the historical Lazarus (John ).No scripture, other than Philippians -25 (in which the apostle expresses the confidence that on departure from this life he would be with Christ), 2 Corinthians 12:2-4 (in which he affirms the possibility of being taken to paradise out of the body), 2 Corinthians 5:8, etc., accounts for a disembodied soul and its comfort or torture.

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The traditional name, Dives, is not actually a name, but instead a word for "rich man", also belongs to the more famous biblical figure Lazarus of Bethany, also known as Lazarus of the Four Days, who is the subject of a prominent miracle of Jesus in the Gospel of John, in which Jesus resurrects him four days after his death.This was generally the view of the medieval Church.Others believe that the main point of the parable was to warn the godless wealthy about their need for repentance in this life and Jesus did not intend to give a preview of life after death. Proponents of the mortality of the soul, and general judgment, for example Advent Christians, Conditionalists, Seventh-day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, Christadelphians, and Christian Universalists, argue that this is a parable using the framework of Jewish views of the Bosom of Abraham, and is metaphorical, and is not definitive teaching on the intermediate state for several reasons.Eastern Orthodox Christians and Latter-Day Saints see the story as consistent with their belief in Hades, where the righteous and unrighteous alike await the resurrection of the dead. In any case, [Jesus] has used [motifs also found in the Egyptian and Jewish stories] to construct a new story, which as a whole is not the same as any other extant story.Therefore it seems to me, this hell is the conscience, which is without faith and without the Word of God, in which the soul is buried and held until the day of judgment, when they are cast down body and soul into the true and real hell.

(Church Postil 1522-23) John Lightfoot (1602–1675) treated the parable as a parody of Pharisee belief concerning the Bosom of Abraham, and from the connection of Abraham saying the rich man's family would not believe even if the parable Lazarus was raised, to the priests' failure to believe in the resurrection of Christ: Any one may see, how Christ points at the infidelity of the Jews, even after that himself shall have risen again.

Supporters of this view point to a key detail in the story: the use of a personal name (Lazarus) not found in any other parable.

By contrast, in all of the other parables Jesus refers to a central character by a description, such as "a certain man", "a sower", and so forth.

It also explains why the rich man assumes Lazarus is Abraham's servant.

Christians debate what the parable says about the afterlife: Most Christians believe in the immortality of the soul and particular judgment and see the story as consistent with it.

This article is about the parable from Gospel of Luke. Lazarus and Dives, illumination from the Codex Aureus of Echternach Top panel: Lazarus at the rich man's door Middle panel: Lazarus' soul is carried to Paradise by two angels; Lazarus in Abraham's bosom Bottom panel: Dives' soul is carried off by two devils to Hell; Dives is tortured in Hades The parable of the rich man and Lazarus (also called the Dives and Lazarus or Lazarus and Dives) is a well-known parable of Jesus appearing in the Gospel of Luke.