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For weeks, even months, you may chat back and forth with one another, forming a connection. But ultimately, it’s going to happen—your new-found “friend” is going to ask you for money.So you send money..rest assured the requests won’t stop there.In a typical con, the perpetrator will spend weeks or even months building up a romantic relationship with a victim through e-mails, texts or phone calls, before eventually asking for money.

A man calling himself "John" messaged her and through daily phone calls and messages on Facebook, he gained her trust.He spoke with what she thought was a British accent and his picture on Facebook portrayed a nice-looking man with graying hair and a beard."In the process of going back and forth, a scammer is going to try to figure out what makes a person tick, what their vulnerable spots are," said Jenny Shearer, an FBI spokeswoman."Because a victim has legitimate feelings, they might be inclined to offer financial support for this person." For Best, it all started when she signed up for a free online dating site called mingle2.And love is the tool scammers use to pry open your bank account and strip you of your assets.

By learning how to spot a scammer, you can protect yourself.

The pictures you were sent were most likely phony lifted from other websites.

The profiles were fake as well, carefully crafted to match your interests.

Millions of Americans visit online dating websites every year hoping to find a companion or even a soulmate.

But as Valentine’s Day gets closer, we want to warn you that criminals use these sites, too, looking to turn the lonely and vulnerable into fast money through a variety of scams.

The victims reported collective losses of .4 million, which is likely only a fraction of the actual losses since many victims are too embarrassed to file a report, the FBI said.